Author: lafocus

Social Justice Protests and Black Lives Matter Apparel Banned from Summer Olympics

Chez Hadley

The Summer Olympics—postponed from 2020— are now set to take place from July 23, 2021 through August 8, 2021 in Tokyo, against the backdrop of the COIVD-19 pandemic. Though no international fans will be allowed, millions will view the games on TV or online.

What officials are trying to ensure that they do not see on that global center stage are any social justice protests from athletes as witnessed in 1968 when Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists during the medals ceremony. Athletes have also reportedly been warned against kneeling during the national anthem.

And yes, Black Lives Matter apparel has also been banned in accordance with a ruling from the International Olympic that any athlete donning them in risk of being punished and or sent home.

However, the words “respect”, “solidarity”, “inclusion” and “equality” are allowed on apparel.

Any athlete breaking the rules can be sanctioned by the IOC, the actual sports governing body or their country’s national Olympics committee.

As the move had been expected, some ruling bodies for individual Olympic sports—like World Athletics,  the international governing body for track and field—have indicated that they will not be punishing athletes for protesting. The U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee has also pledged not to sanction athletes for peaceful protests.

In fact, some have promised legal support for athletes who decide to protest.

Global Athlete, an international athlete-led movement, issued a statement against the suppression of an athlete’s rights to freedom of expression, writing: “The International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) archaic approach to limiting athletes’ rights to freedom of expression is another sign of an outdated sport system that continues to suppress athletes’ fundamental rights. The competitors are humans first, athletes second.”

Romance Novels Written by Stacy Abrams—Under Assumed Name—Set to be Reissued

Staff

President Biden recently said she could be whatever she wanted to be, even president. But Stacey Abrams probably already knew that. Fact is, before she was an activist, attorney, former Gubernatorial candidate and one of the most powerful and influential African-American women in America, Stacy Abrams, it seems, had a whole other career as a romance novelist. And next year, three of the eight out-of-print romance novels she authored more than 20 years ago—under the assumed name of Selena Montgomery—are set to reissued.

Random House recently acquired the novels—Rules of Engagement, The Art of Desire and Power of Persuasion—and will begin releasing them in 2022. Not that she didn’t have some modicum of success with the eight novels— including such titles as Hidden Sins, Secrets and Lies, Reckless, and Deception— which altogether sold upwards of 100,000 copies, but to be sure, sales of the re-released titles are sure to soar.

(Look out Shonda Rhimes).

‘As my first novels, they remain incredibly special to me,’ Abrams said in a statement. “The characters and their adventures are what I’d wished to read as a young Black woman — stories that showcase women of color as nuanced, determined, and exciting. As Selena and as Stacey, I am proud to be a part of the romance writing community and excited that Berkley is reintroducing these stories for new readers and faithful fans.”

The 47-year old voting rights advocate and founder of Fair Fight Action, is said to be considering another run in Georgia’s 2022 gubernatorial race. In the meantime, her latest book, While Justice Sleeps, set for release on May 11, is being described as “a gripping, complexly plotted thriller set within the halls of the U.S. Supreme Court”.

“My success is tied at the most base level with the success of my people, and my people are the South,” Abrams recently posted. “My people are Americans. My people are people of color. My success can only ever be real if I’m doing it for the success of others.”

More Trouble for Inglewood Mayor James Butts

The City of Inglewood had better have some deep pockets because attorneys for the City of Los Angeles are suing for nearly $300,000 in damages stemming from an automobile accident involving Mayor James Butts two years ago.

In the April 2019 incident—which was captured on video—Butts, who is riding in an SUV near USC, collided with an oncoming car and then strikes a parked motorcycle traffic officer who is thrown off of his bike and into a water fountain.

The officer, Michael Flynn, suffered extensive injuries, including broken ribs, damage to his nervous system and “permanent physical disability, impairment, scarring and disfigurement, according to legal documents.

The occupants of the other vehicle—a woman and her four year old son—also suffered injuries, though they were not disclosed.

The lawsuit seeks $290,000 in damages to offset not only the officer’s medical costs, but also damage to city property. The officer is also separately suing the City of Inglewood and Butts to cover medical expenses, loss of income and even damage to the officer and his wife’s relationship.

A third lawsuit has been filed on behalf of the woman and her son for lost wages and emotional distress as well as past and future medical fees.

Butts initially said he would take responsibility for the accident if he was found to be at fault, but the City of Inglewood is now reportedly suggesting— in legal papers—that he may only be partially to blame for the accident.

To that end, Inglewood’s City Council has rejected claims from all three parties, the City of Los Angeles, Officer Flynn and the occupants of the second vehicle.

Butts, who is currently being sued by former assistant and ex-girlfriend, Melanie McDade, was also recently accused of sexual misconduct by a second woman, who is seeking $5 million in damages.

This claim was also rejected by Inglewood’s City Council on April 12 and the Mayor has denied the allegations.

More Trouble for Inglewood Mayor James Butts

The City of Inglewood had better have some deep pockets because attorneys for the City of Los Angeles are suing for nearly $300,000 in damages stemming from automobile accident involving Mayor James Butts two years ago.

In the April 2019 incident—which was captured on video—Butts, who is riding in an SUV near USC, collided with an oncoming car and then strikes a parked motorcycle traffic officer who is thrown off of his bike and into a water fountain.

The officer, Michael Flynn, suffered extensive injuries, including broken ribs, damage to his nervous system and “permanent physical disability, impairment, scarring and disfigurement, according to legal documents.

The occupants of the other vehicle—a woman and her four year old son—also suffered injuries, though they were not disclosed.

The lawsuit seeks $290,000 in damages to offset not only the officer’s medical costs, but also damage to city property. The officer is also separately suing the City of Inglewood and Butts to cover medical expenses, loss of income and even damage to the officer and his wife’s relationship.

A third lawsuit has been filed on behalf of the woman and her son for lost wages, emotional distress as well as past and future medical fees.

Butts initially said he would take responsibility for the accident if he was found to be at fault, but in legal papers, the City of Inglewood is now reportedly suggesting he may only be partially to blame.

To that end, Inglewood’s City Council has rejected claims from all three parties, the City of Los Angeles, Officer Flynn and the occupants of the second vehicle.

Butts, who is also being sued by former assistant and ex-girlfriend, Melanie McDade, was also recently accused of sexual misconduct by a second woman, who is seeking $5 million in damages.

According to the lawsuit, filed by Attorney Carl Douglas who also represents McDade, “Butts would make it known to claimant that if she did not give into his sexual advances, he would destroy her reputation and make sure she had no chance of working with the City of Inglewood.

The encounters allegedly ranged from demanding she rub his feet, to forcing her to perform sexual acts.

The claim was rejected by Inglewood’s City Council on April 12 and the Mayor has denied the allegations.

$30 Billion Tax Incentive Proposed for Those Who Invest In Black Businesses

Inspired by an FCC Tax Certificate Policy established in the 70’s, BET founder Bob Johnson has proposed the enactment of a $30 billion tax incentive legislation to provide pref- erential treatment on gains to those who invest in businesses owned by Black Americans and other minorities.

The proposed legislation– dubbed the BOOST Act (Better Opportunity and Outcomes for Socially Disadvantaged Talent)–addresses the longstanding problem minority businessowners face in attracting cap- ital, particularly “strategic equity” capital.

The biggest challenge to racial equality in our nation is the glaring wealth chasm between Black and white American families,” said Johnson, in announcing the plan. “To close that gap, there must be a commitment to find- ing a workable solution to the lack of capital in the Black community.”

Johnson–who presently serves as CEO of The RLJ Companies–believes that access to capital is just as important as voting rights. “The BOOST Act, if enacted by Congress through tax legislation and embraced by investors, would elevate Black and minority businesses into the wealth-building and wealth-accumulation economic system that is the principal driver of economic opportunity and achievement in our capitalistic economy”.

“Keeping Everything In Perspective”

LISA COLLINS
Publisher

Last month, the nation’s rollout in vaccina- tions experienced a hiccup when the CDC -temporarily paused Johnson & Johnson’s one dose vaccine, – a move that set vaccine hesitancy back a notch or two. The decision was made after six (eventually increasing to a total of 15) cases of thrombosis-thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) or blood clots in the large blood vessels in the brain in what was an extremely rare occurrence for those with low blood platelets.

Of course, the rarity makes little difference if your loved one is the one in a million, but here’s some data that could help to keep things in perspective, keeping in mind that all of the cases occurred in women between the ages of 18 and 59–with a median age of 37 years with symptom onset 6 to 15 days after vaccination.

Deadly blood clots caused by birth control pills kill 300-400 women in the U.S. every year. According to another report, 100 people die every day of taking too much Tylenol. In fact, Acetaminophen (Tylenol) toxicity is the second most common cause of liver transplantation worldwide and is responsible for 56,000 emergency department visits, 2,600 hospitalizations, and 500 deaths per year in the United States. Fifty percent of them unin- tentional according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information.
The truth is there are risks to nearly every medication on the market.

Here’s the more relevant statistic. Without any of the three vaccines, 290 out of 100,000 blacks in L.A. County will die of COVID-19, according to the L.A. County Department of Public Health.

The good news is we are heading towards normalcy. Just recently, the CDC relaxed some of the restrictions about mask wearing and Governor Newsom has said that by June 15 California will lift most COVID restrictions and reopen the economy.

With outdoor mask restrictions the first to go, experts are now focused on high risk settings, such as large gatherings and closed spaces with poor ventilation, which is why –erring on the side of caution–our annual First Ladies High Tea is scheduled for April 2022.
And keep those vaccination cards handy. All indica- tions are that you will need them to prove that you have been immunized against COVID-19. According to some, they are the ticket back to the good old days and yet another reason to get vaccinated,– that’s unless you live in Texas or Florida where they are being banned.

In what was last month’s other big news story, a jury in Minneapolis came to the right verdict in a decision that is reverberating in police departments across the nation following a case that sparked the nation’s most intense reckoning on racial issues since the civil rights movement. This, as Americans are finding out just how deadly traffic stops can be for black men, and though less frequently black women, with Daunte Wright among the latest fatal casualties.

A report by the Los Angeles Police Department’s Office of the Inspector General, published last year found traffic stops of whites (and some other groups) were most likely to be related to how the suspects were driving, while Black and Hispanic people were most likely to be stopped for having expired vehicle registration docu- ments, or some other regulatory or equipment violation.

Philando Castile was stopped 52 times resulting in 86 minor traffic offenses before he was ultimately shot to death in a traffic stop in 2016 that turned tragic in less than a minute.

We understand that police are human and make mis- takes. So too are the people they stop. Caution is always advised. Abuse is not acceptable.

Still, there are those who would argue that the jury had to find him guilty to stave off riots characterizing the verdict as mob justice even as one columnist ironically wrote: “a guilty man was railroaded.”

The truth of the matter was a not so perfect man was killed that day, despite people pleading with a heartless officer to take his knee off his neck so he could breathe.

After years of drug abuse, perhaps his heart wasn’t the strongest. He also had Fentanyl in his system and he may have inhaled carbon dioxide, but keeping everything in perspective, but for the knee on his neck, George Floyd would have lived to die another day.

There are reports that officers are leaving police forces in droves. But if that’s due to the idea that they could or should be held accountable for their actions–or their prejudices, perhaps they shouldn’t have been there in the first place.

I respect the fact that police put their lives on the line every day, but I respect just as much that the black com- munity shouldn’t have to fear that a traffic stop could cost them their lives.

I’ve always believed that police should be held to a higher standard given the power they’ve been given under color of authority. And for all the talk about bad apples, some- times they fall from rotten trees.

George Floyd’s family got $27 million in a settlement, but that won’t solve the problem. After all, in police set- tlements, it’s taxpayers like you who foot the bill.

In closing, I want to wish all a Happy Mother’s Day, especially to my Mom, Aleasta Newborn, who taught me that for every problem I had, that I was part of the problem and that just as surely I was most of the solution.

Keep the faith.

“Police Reform and Personal Responsibility”

It is indeed rare, if not unprecedented, to see a highly diverse group of organizations such as the conserva- tive Alliance Defending Freedom, the liberal American Civil Liberties Union, the libertarian Cato

Institute and the Reason Foundation on the same page as the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund on the same issue.

But it is happening as the U.S. Senate takes up police reform. The issue is a legal doctrine known as qualified immunity.

These diverse organizations all agree that qualified immunity is bad law and should end.

The discussion is particularly high-powered today because it stands at the center of police reform that many see is needed in the wake of incidents such as the murder of George Floyd by former police officer Derek Chauvin.

The nation’s first major civil rights law, the Civil Rights Act of 1871, passed shortly after the Civil War, contains a provision known as Section 1983 that protects citizens from violation of their civil rights by government officials. It says that a government official who violates a citizen’s civil rights is liable and can be sued by the injured party.

Thus stood the law, until a series of Supreme Court decisions from 1967 to 1982 reinterpreted its application. A new standard, qualified immunity, was added say- ing that it must be shown that rights were violated per “clearly established law.” That is, there must be a previ- ous case in which rights were violated the exact same
way.

So, if a citizen’s rights are violated but there is no previous case in which rights were violated in exactly that way, there is no protection. The government official is immune from liability.

Although the law applies to violation of a citizen’s civil rights by any government official, the hot button today is
violations by police.

The qualified immunity doctrine makes establishing liability next to impossible, thus removing a serious deterrent against police violating civil rights in their law enforcement activities.

Police leadership and unions argue that qualified immunity is essential for them to do their job. This is a tough and dangerous business, they say, and split-second law enforcement decisions must be made, often under great uncertainty, sometimes with life-and-death impli- cations.

But police officers being able to make deadly decisions, with no sense of personal responsibility and costs, leads to some of the horrors that we are seeing today.

Derek Chauvin had 18 complaints against him before he committed his final deadly act against George Floyd. Had the incident, in all its gory and tragic details, not been captured on video by a young onlooker, the legal out-
come likely would have been much different.

Personal responsibility must be the hallmark in a free country, whether we’re talking about obeying the law or enforcing it. When right and wrong become ambiguous, when personal responsibility becomes ambiguous, we see
the chaos we are witnessing today.

Police officers perform a vital function in our society.
But what does law enforcement mean when law has no meaning? And law has no meaning if officers have free license to violate citizens’ civil rights.

A creative solution has been proposed by the Cato Institute: Require police officers to carry liability insur- ance, like other professionals do. This would provide them the coverage they need. And those who are flagrant violators, like Derek Chauvin, would be priced out of the market.

The only stalwart on the Supreme Court questioning the status quo on qualified immunity has been Clarence Thomas.
Thomas is an originalist – read the law as written – and opposed to judicial activism. He has written that qualified immunity is “the sort of ‘freewheeling policy choice(s)’ that we have previously disclaimed the power to make.”

Thomas has urged the court to take on and review this issue. “I continue to have strong doubts about our … qual- ified immunity doctrine,” he wrote last year.

Policing should be a local issue, not a national one. But civil rights is a national issue, and qualified immunity should be reformed.

Star Parker is president of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education and host of the weekly television show “Cure America with Star Parker.” To find out more about Star Parker and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate web- site at www.creators.com

Profile: Rev Brings Healing Approach to Domestic Violence Fight

Sunita Sohrabji | Ethnic Media Services

Combating domestic violence requires a healing-centered approach which doesn’t always remove an abuser from the household nor criminalizes him, said Dr. Aleese Moore-Orbih, incoming director of the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence (CPEDV).

“I have never come across a woman who did not want to help her abusive partner. Leaving an abusive relationship is an old paradigm. Women of color want to stay with their partners and want agencies to help the abusive partner break out of their cycle of violence,” said Moore-Orbih, in an interview with Ethnic Media Services. “For me, the call has been to help people see one another, with all their shortcomings, and still love them.”

Moore-Orbih will officially joined the CPEDV team April 19.

The Partnership, founded nearly 40 years ago, represents over 1,000 survivors, advocates, organizations and allied individuals across California. The organization has successfully advocated for over 200 pieces of legislation on behalf of domestic violence victims and their children, and it brings a racial justice focus to the issue.

Moore-Orbih, a United Church of Christ pastor, whose career has focused on racial justice and violence against women, hopes to bring a new paradigm to the role, focusing on the intersectionality of factors that can contribute to an abusive relationship, including race and ethnicity, socioeconomic class, gender and sexual orientation, age, ability, and immigrant identity. The Partnership noted in a press release that she “will raise the visibility of the Partnership’s anti-oppression work, move the public discourse, and support policy and community advocacy toward more effective prevention and intervention solutions.”

“People of color already live in an environment that is hostile towards them. Their survival mechanisms are seen as criminal and violent,” said Moore-Orbih, noting the generational trauma of slavery and Jim Crow laws, the continuous murders of young Black men without cause, poor economic conditions, and housing insecurity.

“It is a system that has traditionally tried to kill people of color, who are brought up with generations of disempowerment. When things are out of control most of the time, you attempt to control it, sometimes with violence,” she said.

For Black and Brown men, masculinity is determined by power. “They have spent a lifetime trying to prove their power to their communities, and their partners,” she said, noting that Black men have traditionally been underemployed while Black women are often over-employed. Women have had to do the delicate dance of bringing in the family’s income, raising their children, and pleasing their man.

“For a woman of color, domestic violence may be fourth or fifth on the list of things they have to deal with,” she said. “I can handle him, but this is all the stuff I cannot handle.”

COVID has added an extra layer of pressure for both survivors and their abusers. “Women doing the cha cha cha all these years are quickly learning the flamenco,” said Moore-Orbih. “But this is nothing new. Our communities have been doing the survival dance for decades.”

Domestic violence has spiked alarmingly as victims are trapped at home with their abusers amid lockdown orders during the COVID pandemic. The New England Journal of Medicine reported last year that one out of every four women in the U.S. and one in 10 men are currently facing abuse from a spouse or intimate partner. At the same time, traditional safety nets have largely been shut down. Domestic violence hotlines have seen a drop in calls as many victims cannot find safe spaces from which to make calls.

Shelters are closed or operating at full capacity, and thereby cannot take on new clients. Black and Brown victims of domestic violence are less likely to call police because of a mistrust of law enforcement or language barriers.

“When COVID broke, we were all struggling trying to figure out how to provide services,” said Moore-Orbih, adding that the number of people sent to hotels tripled, as survivors had to quarantine for 14 days before they could be sent to a shelter.

“COVID became another layer of pressure for people who were already drowning in anxiety, fear, ad trauma. If a person is trying to save you, you can’t see that,” she said.

Getting a woman out of her home and into a shelter to build self-esteem and self-reliance is just one small piece, said the reverend. “She is not healed.”

Similarly, Moore-Orbih does not support criminalizing perpetrators who must also be healed via the same holistic approach.

An integrative holistic approach must be brought to both survivor and perpetrator, said Moore-Orbih. “If we are looking to make people whole again, we must address the psyche, the physical ailments, forced immigration, and slavery.”

Sen. Padilla on Reparations: “We Can Walk and Chew Gum”

Manny Otiko | California Black Media

California’s newest and first Latino Democratic Senator, Alex Padilla, says he supports reparations for Black American descendants of enslaved African people. He made the statement during an online news briefing with members of California’s ethnic press organized by Ethnic Media Services.

“It’s the morally right thing to do,” said Padilla. “For me, it’s not a difficult conversation.”
Padilla said reparations would go a long way to “address institutional injustices.”
For nearly two centuries now, Black American descendants of enslaved Africans have been
making the case to an unbudging U.S. government for reparations. Advocates say payments would compensate for centuries of unpaid labor and an opportunity for the federal government to make good on its promise to provide 40 acres and a mule to each formerly enslaved Black person after the Civil War.
A shift in the national consciousness last year — some attribute to organizing around Black economic and political empowerment led in part by the American Descendants of Slaves Movement and the national reckoning on race that began last summer after the killing of George Floyd — has ushered in a political environment in the United States where many legislators are much more open than they have been in the past to reparations.

“We have to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time,” Padilla said. “We should be able to negotiate and advance and infrastructure package, and immigration reform and protect the rights of voters, and work on environmental protection, and address historical injustices like this.”

Earlier this month, Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee voted to approve forming a committee to study the idea of providing reparations to African Americans.

Padilla is a veteran politician who’s worked his way up the political ladder, previously serving as a Los Angeles city councilman, as a state senator and as secretary of State before he was nominated in January to replace outgoing Sen. Kamala Harris.

Padilla said that he has been senator for less than 100 days, but he’s packed a lot into that short period. During his first couple of months, he participated in President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial, and voted to approve the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 intended to help Americans devastated economically by the coronavirus pandemic.

In the Senate, he is pushing and supporting a number of bills on a range of issues, including proposals focused on immigration reform (providing a pathway to citizenship for essential workers) and hate crimes against Asian Americans.

Padilla, the son of Mexican immigrants, grew up in the Pacoima, Los Angeles, a neighborhood in the San Fernando Valley. His father worked for 40 years as a short-order cook and his late mother cleaned houses. Both parents were local activists who fought against violence in their community. Padilla said they were the inspiration for his political career.

“Through their hard work, we had a modest upbringing to put it mildly,” said Padilla. “We grew up with the values of service to others, and hard work, but we also saw our parents get very involved in the community.”

Black Unemployment Increases as California Job Market Recovers

Bo Tefu | California Black Media

There has been a gradual increase in the unemployment rate among Blacks Californians despite an overall improvement in the state’s labor market, according to a job report the Employment Development Department of California (EDD) compiled.

National data from the U.S. Department of Labor shows that Black workers lag behind in the recovery of California’s job market although the state’s unemployment rate decreased to 8.3 % in the first quarter of 2021.

“California’s economic recovery depends on bringing back the businesses and jobs we’ve lost over the past year,” said California Gov. Gavin Newsom.

According to the job report, Black Californians have the highest unemployment rate which increased to 13.9 % in the first quarter of this fiscal year. The report also stated that the unemployment rate for Black people in the labor force has more than doubled since the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020.

Since the state expanded vaccine eligibility, California’s labor force has gained close to 120,000 jobs with more than half of those jobs being offered in the leisure and hospitality industries. State officials are optimistic that vaccine efforts will bolster more job opportunities statewide.

The slow and steady decrease of the state’s unemployment rate shows that, “we still have a long way to go,” said Gov. Newsom.

State officials said that the slight decrease in California’s unemployment rate is a step in the right direction to reopening the economy in June this year. According to the EDD job report, there are over 1.5 million unemployed people in California. However, state officials project that reopening the state will accelerate the recovery of California’s job market.

In a joint public statement, Dee Dee Myers, the director of the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (GO-Biz), and Julie A. Su, California’s Secretary for the California Labor and Workforce Development Agency, said the state’s vaccine initiatives work hand-in-hand with efforts to restore the job market.

“With vaccine eligibility now expanded to Californians 16 and older, our safe reopening and strong recovery will require an ongoing commitment to vaccine access and to a safe workplace for everyone, as more and more Californians get back to work,” said the state officials.

National versus state unemployment rates among Blacks

The Black population is the only ethnic group to experience a steady increase in unemployment during the first quarter of the fiscal year. According to labor market data by the state, the unemployment rate among Whites decreased to 10.8 % as compared to 13.9 % for Blacks.

Even at the national level, Blacks have the highest unemployment rate among other ethnic groups including White, Latino and Asians. The rate of unemployed Blacks is nearly double that of Whites which decreased to 5.4 %, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

The national unemployment rate for Blacks sits at 9.6 %, which is nearly 4 % lower than California’s current numbers, according to an economic report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Additional data detailing the demographics of the national labor force showed that unemployment increased to 8.7 % for Black women and 9.8 % for Black men respectively at the start of the fiscal year.

According to BLS county data, the unemployment rate for major counties with large Black populations in descending order include Los Angeles at 10.9 %, San Bernardino and Solano tied at 8.1 %, and Alameda at 6.8 %

Bill to rehire displaced workers

The state lost close to 3 million jobs at the start of the pandemic, which displaced many in California’s labor force. According to labor market data by the EDD, the state is yet to regain a majority of the jobs lost a year after the pandemic first hit.

To mitigate the loss of jobs in the labor force, Gov. Newsom recently legislated a bill that aims to rehire workers who lost their jobs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
The recent bill, SB 93, was enacted to ensure that employers in the hospitality and business services industries offer new positions to qualified former employees.

“As we progress toward fully reopening our economy, it is important we maintain our focus on equity,” said Gov. Newsom.

Essentially, the bill prohibits employers from, “refusing to employ, terminating, reducing compensation, or taking other adverse action against any laid-off employee for seeking to enforce their rights,” under California labor laws.

“SB 93 keeps us moving in the right direction by assuring hospitality and other workers displaced by the pandemic are prioritized to return to their workplace,” he said.

The bill is set to hold employers accountable for rehiring former employees until the year 2024, as part of the state’s efforts to promote equity in the labor force and make up for the economic loss during the COVID-19 pandemic.

California Black Media’s coverage of COVID-19 is supported by the California Health Care Foundation.


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