Shootout in South Los Angeles involved Ontario Police; no injuries reported and suspect in custody

Officers from the Ontario Police Department were involved in a shootout in South Los Angeles on Tuesday afternoon, May 4, while attempting to apprehend a  homicide suspect wearing body armor, police said. No injuries were reported.

Ontario officers were in the area of Main and 66th streets conducting surveillance when they attempted to detain the suspect. The suspect then allegedly fired at the officers with a rifle, which led to officers returning fire, police said.

The suspect then fled on foot before he was arrested by responding officers with the Los Angeles Police Department.

Neither the suspect nor officers were injured in the shooting, police said.

A handgun and a rifle that were in the suspect’s possession were recovered, police said.

Citing the ongoing investigation,  Ontario Police Cpl. Emily Hernandez said the department was not releasing the identity of the suspect or disclosing which homicide he is suspected in.

More sloppy defense costs Angels in loss to Rays

ANAHEIM — The Angels’ surprising defensive issues were on display in all their ugliness on Tuesday night.

Four more Angels errors – increasing their major league-leading total to 29 in 28 games – led to three unearned runs on their way to an 8-3 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays.

The Angels also lost a player for the second straight night because of a foul ball off his knee.

Justin Upton suffered a right knee contusion in the same way that Anthony Rendon did on Monday, although Upton’s didn’t look nearly as bad. Upton actually remained in the game, drew a walk and played an inning in left field before coming out. Upton did not need to undergo X-rays because it was a soft tissue contusion, but there was no immediate word on how many days he might be out.

Catcher Max Stassi also left the game in the ninth inning after he went awkwardly into the railing along the dugout chasing a foul pop. Stassi was being evaluated on Tuesday night, with an update expected on Wednesday.

It was all part of a tough night for the Angels, who also gave up four runs on two home runs by Austin Meadows against Ben Rowen in the seventh and eighth innings.

Rowen was pitching because the Angels already trailed 4-1, thanks to the sloppy defense.

It has been an unexpected problem throughout the season’s first month. The Angels projected to be a good defensive team, especially on the infield.

“Those are the kind of things we have to tighten up and get better,” Manager Joe Maddon said. “If you’re good at defense, you should be good 97 percent of the time. We have good defenders and we have to stay with them.”

On Tuesday night the troubles started in the first inning.

With two outs, Manny Margot hit a hard ground ball directly at shortstop José Iglesias, who bobbled it and was unable to pick it up in time to even make a throw.

On the next pitch, Brandon Lowe hit a grounder to the right side. With the Angels shifted, second baseman David Fletcher was playing in shallow right and had no chance to get an out, but once he got to the ball he kicked it into center field, far enough away that Margot scored.

“I have a huge amount fo faith in this defense,” said Alex Cobb, the pitcher who was on the mound during that first inning. “I have watched them for over a month and I have seen what they’re capable of. It’s been odd, some of the hops that we’re getting. I don’t know how to attribute it to anything but some funky hops. Fletch and Iggy have gotten their fair share of weird spinners and balls hopping up on them. It’s going to even out on us. Those guys are too good. We’ve been getting some fluky plays hit to us.”

Cobb’s biggest issue over the next three innings was self-inflicted, with five walks. But he did not give up any more runs until the fifth, when the defense burned him again.

Randy Arozarena led off with a clean single. He stole second, and Stassi’s throw went into center field, allowing him to take third. He scored on a ground ball.

Those two unearned runs were all that Cobb allowed, but the Rays scored two more in the sixth with more help from the Angels. With runners at first and second and one out, Stassi let an Alex Claudio pitch get by him for a passed ball.

Because both runners moved up, the Angels had to bring the infield in, and that allowed Kevin Kiermaier’s bouncer to get between first baseman Albert Pujols and Fletcher, knocking in two runs.

Even that play, which was not scored an error, didn’t look quite right, as Fletcher and Pujols each seemed to pull up and allow the ball to scoot between them.

“It’s not even about the errors,” Maddon said. “It’s the balls we need to catch and make plays on that we’re not.”

Dodgers’ freefall continues with doubleheader sweep by Cubs

Riding high in April, shot down in May? That’s life for the Dodgers now.

Since starting the season 13-2, the Dodgers have the worst record in the National League (and only the woeful Detroit Tigers are worse in the American League) after being swept by the Chicago Cubs in a doubleheader on Tuesday at Wrigley Field.

Clayton Kershaw lasted just one inning, the shortest start of his career, in the opener, a 7-1 loss. The offense that broke out with a 16-run orgy in Milwaukee on Sunday managed just one run in the first 13 innings Tuesday then couldn’t hold a two-run lead, losing to the Cubs, 4-3, in the ninth inning in the nightcap.

The Dodgers have now lost eight of their last 10 games and 12 of 16 since that mid-April high-water mark. They have lost four consecutive series for the first time since they dropped five from Aug. 25-Sept. 10, 2017 while losing 15 of 17 games.

The Dodgers had already run away with the NL West and were up 21 games when that 2017 slump set in. If they could be forgiven for that freefall due to boredom, there should be no such excuse now.

“That’s baseball,” said Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner, whose home run in the eighth inning of the second game gave the Dodgers their only lead of the day. “I mean, it’s not the first time that we’ve gone through a skid. In ’17 in September, we went through a worse skid and still wound up winning 104 games.

“No one feels sorry for us. We can’t take anything for granted. Still got to show up and do all the little things and play the game the right way. The bottom line is we’ve got to play better.”

There is something else in common between the two worst stretches of the Dodgers’ past five regular seasons – in both cases, the Dodgers were being hailed as capable of threatening the all-time record for wins (116) before they were introduced to the concept of hubris.

“I didn’t realize that,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said of his team’s status as the NL’s worst team over the past three weeks. “Obviously, we haven’t won a whole lot of baseball games in the last couple of weeks. I think if you just kind of look at how we’re playing baseball it’s just not all around, all facets of the game executing.

“That’s what happens when you don’t do that. You keep other teams in it. They get a big hit. They make a big play and you end up being on the short end of things. … I think that obviously, we’re better than what we’ve shown and we’ve got to get back to doing the little things and playing good baseball.”

The Dodgers have lost more one-run games (eight) than any team in baseball. The second game Tuesday was the sixth time the Dodgers have gone to extra innings this season. They have lost five of those games and Roberts acknowledged “the innings prior to the extra innings, collectively, we could have done a better job to not even be in that extra-innings situation.”

Other than the starting pitching, though, no facet of the Dodgers’ roster has lived up to its billing.

“Probably not,” Roberts said to that. “I think the ’pen has been fine. You’ve had some young guys pitching in some spots that they haven’t pitched in before. So you can’t put it on these guys. They’re going out there competing and learning on the fly. But outside of that, yeah, we need to be considerably better.”

Roberts didn’t point a finger at himself. But he could have.

As much as the Dodgers have been searching for offense lately, he left one of the team’s few hot hitters, Matt Beaty, on the bench. Nine for 17 since returning from the alternate training site and coming off a seven-RBI game Sunday, Beaty wasn’t in the starting lineup for either game. When Roberts sent him up to pinch-hit in the sixth inning of the second game Tuesday, Roberts pulled him for Sheldon Neuse when the Cubs answered by bringing in a left-handed reliever.

The Cubs did everything they could to hand the second game to the Dodgers, going hitless in their first 17 at-bats with runners in scoring postion. Trevor Bauer worked out of jams in his 4-2/3 innings, giving up only a solo home run to Jason Heyward. Blake Treinen escaped a bases-loaded, no-outs situation in the sixth.

That kept the game close enough for Max Muncy to tie it with a solo home run in the seventh. It was the first earned run allowed by Cubs closer Craig Kimbrel this season and Muncy’s first home run since April 15. In between, he went 3 for 46 with 21 strikeouts (including each of his previous seven at-bats) and no extra-base hits.

The Dodgers took the lead in the eighth when Edwin Rios scored on a wild pitch and Turner came off the bench to hit a pinch-hit homer.

But Roberts was down to his final options in the bullpen. Rookie Mitch White gave up a game-tying two-run home run to Javier Baez in the bottom of the eighth and lefty Garrett Cleavinger gave up the deciding run in the ninth on an RBI single by David Bote.

“We’ve got to play better baseball, obviously, all around,” Bauer said after the sweep. “We’ve got to play smarter baseball. We’ve got to do the little things right.

“It’s one of those things right now where we don’t seem to be able to put together a complete game. The pitching is good then the offense won’t score. Then the offense scores and the pitching will give up runs. Everything is just kind of mismatched for us. It just starts with taking care of little details and trusting that if you do the little things right then ultimately the whole picture will look a lot better.”

Clippers fend off Raptors, end 3-game losing streak

The Clippers’ growing pains were evident for large stretches on Tuesday night, as they worked to re-integrate key personnel in a 105-100 victory over the Toronto Raptors before 1,714 fans at Staples Center.

The win snapped a three-game losing streak, but it was a sloppy – or “building,” per Patrick Beverly – effort for the mostly whole hosts, who committed 18 turnovers and got just 13 points from their star Kawhi Leonard, who was under duress by Raptors defenders, on a minutes restriction and finished 3 for 6 from the field in 33 minutes.

On Tuesday, Beverley made his return; a game earlier, it had been Leonard.

Neither rode to the rescue, exactly, as the Clippers lost their third in a row Saturday and had to sweat it out against a short-handed Raptors contingent being steered adeptly by Fred VanVleet and feeding off opportunistic understudy energy.

Paul George and Reggie Jackson helped save the day down the stretch Tuesday: Jackson drove through traffic for a tough layup to tie the score at 99-all and George blocked VanVleet and canned an open 3-pointer to make it 102-99 with 2:06 on the clock.

Then George held his ground on a Pascal Siakam drive, drawing a charge.

Swarmed, as he was all evening, by Toronto defenders, Leonard delivered a pass to Jackson, who knocked down the dagger 3-pointer that made it 105-100 with 1:06 remaining. It was the biggest of the Clippers’ 15 3-pointers and 28 assists Tuesday.

George (8 for 16) and Marcus Morris Sr. (8 for 11) both scored 22 points to lead the Clippers (44-22), and Jackson finished with 18, seven of which came in the final period. Beverley played 15 minutes, scored eight points on 3-for-5 shooting and finished with three assists and a steal.

VanVleet led the Raptors (27-39) with 27 points and a season-high 13 assists.

After beating the Lakers, 121-114, despite being at less than full strength on Sunday, the Raptors on Tuesday played without Kyle Lowry (lower back stiffness), as well as OG Anunoby (calf), Gary Trent Jr (leg)., Chris Boucher (knee) and Paul Watson (knee).

Meanwhile, the Clippers were nearly whole Tuesday, missing only center Serge Ibaka (back), the former Raptor whose return doesn’t seem imminent.

Toronto led 54-48 at halftime despite the Clippers shooting 54.1% and the Raptors connecting on 51.2% of their shots.

The Raptors took five more shots, though, doing what they do as league-leading turnover artists (16.2 per game) and forcing the Clippers into 10 first-half turnovers, including seven in the second quarter.

Leonard didn’t get his eighth point until the third quarter, with which the Moreno Valley native surpassed 11,000 NBA points. Almost two minutes later, he made his first 3-point attempt of the evening – and just his fifth shot attempt, total – to tie the score at 71-71 with 3:28 to play in the period.

Nicolas Batum’s steal and streaking bucket gave the Clippers the 73-71 lead, their first advantage since late in the first quarter.

They seemed like they might start to pull away, but a turnover (Rondo’s fourth of sixth), a Jalen Harris 3-pointer for the Raptors and George’s miss from 3-point range tied it at 82-82 entering the final 12 minutes.

Early in the fourth quarter, Rondo found Batum in transition for a right-handed slam that tilted the game back toward L.A., however slightly (86-84), and triggered a Toronto timeout.

The Clippers maintained that edge until a couple of Khem Birch buckets made it 91-88 with 6:38 left.

A fed-up dunk by Ivica Zubac and a friendly bounce on a Morris 3-pointer cut the Raptors’ lead to 94-93 with five minutes left. Then Morris backed down the shorter VanVleet and drained turnaround jumper to give L.A. the lead, 95-94, and it went back and forth until George and Jackson shut the door.

More to come on this story.

Dodgers lose in extra innings, get swept by Cubs in doubleheader

  • Dodgers starting pitcher Trevor Bauer throws to the plate during the second game of their doubleheader against the Cubs on Tuesday at Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Starting pitcher Trevor Bauer #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers delivers the ball against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Keegan Thompson #71 of the Chicago Cubs delivers the ball in his first Major League start against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Keegan Thompson #71 of the Chicago Cubs delivers the ball in his first Major League start against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Mookie Betts #50 of the Los Angeles Dodgers celebrates after hitting a lead-off double in the 1st inning against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Starting pitcher Trevor Bauer #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers delivers the ball against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Jason Heyward #22 of the Chicago Cubs reacts after striking out with men on base to end the 1st inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • Chicago Cubs’ Kris Bryant, left, slides safely into second for a double off Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Trevor Bauer as shortstop Corey Seager looks to apply a late tag during the third inning of a baseball game Tuesday, May 4, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Jason Heyward #22 of the Chicago Cubs runs the bases after hitting a solo home run off of Trevor Bauer #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 4th inning at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Jason Heyward #22 of the Chicago Cubs celebrates his solo home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 4th inning at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Trevor Bauer delivers during the first inning of a baseball game against the Chicago Cubs Tuesday, May 4, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Kris Bryant #17 of the Chicago Cubs reacts after striking out with the bases loaded to end the 4th inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Trevor Bauer delivers during the first inning of a baseball game against the Chicago Cubs Tuesday, May 4, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • Chicago Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo hits a triple off Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Trevor Bauer during the fifth inning of a baseball game Tuesday, May 4, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers center fielder Chris Taylor is unable to catch a ball hit for a triple by Chicago Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo during the fifth inning of a baseball game Tuesday, May 4, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers Max Muncy hits a home run off Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Craig Kimbrel during the seventh inning of a baseball game Tuesday, May 4, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • Los Angeles Dodgers’ Max Muncy and third base coach Dino Ebel celebrates Muncy’s home run off Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Craig Kimbrel during the seventh inning of a baseball game Tuesday, May 4, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Edwin Rios #43 of the Los Angeles Dodgers scores a run on a wild pitch by Dillon Maples #36 of the Chicago Cubs in the 8th inning at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits a solo home run in the 8th inning against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Javier Baez #9 of the Chicago Cubs hits a game-tying, two run home run in the 8th inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • The Cubs’ Javy Baez tracks the flight of his game-tying, two-run home run in the eighth inning of the second game of Tuesday’s doubleheader against the Dodgers at Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Javier Baez #9 of the Chicago Cubs celebrates his game-tying, two run home run in the 8th inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • Chicago Cubs’ David Bote watches his game winning single off Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Garrett Cleavinger during the ninth inning of a baseball game Tuesday, May 4, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: David Bote #13 of the Chicago Cubs
    hits the game-winning single in the 9th inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs defeated the Dodgers 4-3 in 9 innings. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • Chicago Cubs’ David Bote celebrates his game winning single off Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Garrett Cleavinger during the ninth inning of a baseball game Tuesday, May 4, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: David Bote #13 of the Chicago Cubs
    celebrates hitting the game-winning single in the 9th inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers as he runs the bases at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs defeated the Dodgers 4-3 in 9 innings. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

  • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – MAY 04: Members of the Chicago Cubs mob David Bote, wo hit the game winning single in the 9th inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Wrigley Field on May 04, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs defeated the Dodgers 4-3 in 9 innings. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

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The Dodgers played with fire all Tuesday evening at Wrigley Field and finally got burned.

Hitless in their first 17 at-bats with runners in scoring position, the Chicago Cubs came through in the eighth and ninth innings to hand the Dodgers a 4-3 loss in the nightcap and sweep the doubleheader.

The loss was the Dodgers’ eighth in their last 10 games and 12th in their last 16. They have lost four consecutive series for the first time since they dropped five from Aug. 25-Sept. 10, 2017 while losing 15 of 17 games.

Since starting the season 13-2, the Dodgers have the worst record in the National League. Only the Detroit Tigers have been worse.

Neither Sunday’s 16-run downpour or Monday’s rainout could totally wash away the Dodgers’ hitting slump. They managed just one run over the first 13 innings of Tuesday’s doubleheader.

The Cubs came into the doubleheader with a group of starting pitchers that had posted the highest ERA in baseball (6.00). But Kyle Hendricks nearly shut them out in the first game, giving up only a solo home run to Keibert Ruiz in the seventh inning.

In the second game, right-hander Keegan Thompson made his first major-league start (though he had pitched an inning in relief earlier this season) after being optioned out Monday when the Cubs activated outfielder Joc Pederson from the Injured List then recalled for Tuesday’s doubleheader.

The Dodgers feasted on Brewers right-hander Alec Bettinger when he made his first major-league start on Sunday – not so much with Thompson.

Mookie Betts led off with a double and Corey Seager drew a walk from Thompson. But Chris Taylor bounced a ball down the third-base line that David Bote fielded as he touched the base then threw to first for a deflating double play.

The Dodgers had just two more hits before Muncy snapped his own slump with a solo home run off Cubs closer Craig Kimbrel in the seventh inning.

It was the first earned run allowed by Kimbrel this season and Muncy’s first home run since April 15. In between, he went 3 for 46 with 21 strikeouts (including each of his previous seven at-bats) and no extra-base hits.

That was enough to tie the score thanks to the work of Dodgers starter Trevor Bauer and the bullpen.

Bauer walked the first two batters he faced and had runners in scoring position in each of his five innings. But he managed to dodge damage with the exception of a solo home run by Jason Heyward in the fourth inning.

Through seven starts as a Dodger, Bauer has allowed 13 runs – 11 have been the result of home runs (three two-run homers and five solo homers). With runners in scoring position, Bauer has allowed just one hit in 24 at-bats while striking out 15.

Six of those strikeouts came with Cubs in scoring position Tuesday, the biggest on a called third strike to Kris Bryant with the bases loaded and two outs in the fourth. After giving up a leadoff triple to Anthony Rizzo in the fifth, Bauer again wriggled away unharmed with the help of Victor Gonzalez who relieved him with one out, got Heyward to bounce into a forceout of Rizzo at home then struck out Ildemaro Vargas.

The Cubs loaded the bases again in the sixth against Dodgers reliever Blake Treinen. But Treinen got a pop-up and two strikeouts to escape.

The backs-to-the-wall efforts by Bauer and Treinen left the Dodgers close enough to win in the eighth after Edwin Rios (the ‘extra’ runner) scored on a wild pitch and Turner hit a pinch-hit home run.

But Mitch White gave up a game-tying two-run home run to Javier Baez in the eighth, and the Cubs pushed across the winning run on David Bote’s one-out single in the ninth, finishing the game 2 for 20 with runners in scoring position.

LAX offering delivery service for food at Tom Bradley International Terminal

LOS ANGELES >> Travelers can order food and beverages from certain LAX restaurants to be delivered directly to their gate at the Tom Bradley International Terminal, it was announced Tuesday.

The program is an extension of the airport’s mobile platform that allows contactless ordering, payment and pickup at restaurants within its terminals through LAXOrderNow.com.

“Our guests have told us they want greater access to airport information and services through their mobile devices so they can have more control of their travel journey,” said Justin Erbacci, CEO of Los Angeles World Airports. “Offering food and beverage delivery to the gate areas is yet another game-changing feature that sets the new LAX experience apart for its convenience and range of options.”

Delivery service is currenty offered only at the Bradley International Terminal, but LAWA expects to add more terminals. Participating restaurants include Vino Volo, Border Grill and ink.sack, but Panda Express and KFC will join later this week and more are expected to join soon, airport officials said.

Travelers who use LAXOrderNow.com to browse airport menus, order and pay will be able to select the delivery option for an extra fee. They’ll then be notified when their meals are out for delivery and when the delivery person, who will be wearing branded apparel for easy identification, has arrived in the designated gate area.

The program is managed by LAX in partnership with Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield and the mobile ordering provider Servy.

“This is about always putting the customer first and creating a seamless commercial experience,” said Mike Salzman, URW’s executive vice president and group director of airports. “Delivery is a really exciting step toward giving guests greater convenience and freedom as they travel.”

Clayton Kershaw’s ‘embarrassing’ short start could aid Dodgers

The shortest start of Clayton Kershaw’s career might solve a dilemma for the Dodgers.

Kershaw allowed four runs and threw 39 pitches in the first inning of Tuesday’s doubleheader against the Chicago Cubs and was pulled by Dodgers manager Dave Roberts.

“It just wasn’t good,” Kershaw said. “It’s embarrassing. No excuses. I was horrible.

“Obviously that’s Doc’s decision (to pull him after one inning). … Obviously, I would have liked to continue to go. But when you’re that bad, you really can’t stand up for yourself too much.”

After striking out Willson Contreras to start his day, the next six batters reached base against Kershaw, including a double by Kris Bryant, an RBI single by Anthony Rizzo and a three-run double by David Bote.

Along the way, Kershaw spiked breaking balls in the dirt well in front of home plate multiple times and managed to walk Javier Baez, who came into the game with 39 strikeouts and just one walk in his first 24 games this season.

“I could overanalyze it and try to think about it. But honestly, I have no idea. They were just horrible,” Kershaw said. “Everything was bad. So I’m not going to try to analyze it too much. Just hope this was an outlier and get ready for the next one.”

By pulling Kershaw so quickly, the Dodgers have created a potential solution for their shortage of starting pitching.

Before the game, Roberts said the Dodgers would likely resort to another “bullpen game” during the series in Anaheim (Friday or Saturday, most likely). Roberts would not say the possibility of starting Kershaw on Saturday was a factor in his decision to pull him after one inning. But Kershaw does now become a candidate to pitch on short rest on Saturday against the Angels.

“The short-rest conversation – we’ll have that conversation,” Roberts said. “We’ll decide in our opinion what is the best for Clayton and the Dodgers here in the next day or two. We’ll talk about it.”

MRI NEWS

Still reeling from the news that Dustin May will have to undergo Tommy John surgery, the Dodgers got some good news on another hard-throwing young right-hander.

Roberts said Brusdar Graterol underwent an MRI on his right arm on Tuesday morning which revealed no structural damage. Graterol started the season on the Injured List for unspecified reasons then went on the IL again after making just three appearances and experiencing soreness in his right forearm.

“The findings, or lack thereof, are good news,” Roberts said.

Graterol has not pitched since April 26 and has not been cleared to start a throwing program yet. There is no timetable for his return.

“We don’t know when he’ll pick up a baseball and play catch,” Roberts said Tuesday. “We just want to make sure the soreness, the uncomfortable-ness of the arm dissipates.”

RUIZ SWINGS

Catcher Keibert Ruiz was added to the active roster Tuesday, taking the spot cleared Monday when the Dodgers designated left-hander Mike Kickham for assignment.

Ruiz pinch-hit in the first game of the doubleheader and continued a tradition in his big-league career – he hit a home run on his first swing just as he did in his big-league debut last season.

“He’s not afraid. He gets in there and gets his swings off,” Roberts said.

It’s uncertain how long Ruiz will remain with the Dodgers. But Roberts indicated the switch-hitter would likely be used more as a pinch-hitter than behind the plate. With Monday’s game rained out and three off days coming, the Dodgers’ front-line catchers, Will Smith and Austin Barnes, will already be getting enough downtime, Roberts said.

ALSO

Top pitching prospect Josiah Gray is scheduled to start the season-opening game Thursday for Triple-A Oklahoma City.

UP NEXT

Dodgers (RHP Walker Buehler, 1-0, 3.16 ERA) at Cubs (RHP Jake Arrieta, 3-3, 4.31 ERA), Wednesday, 4:40 p.m., SportsNet LA, ESPN, 570 AM

LA’s Little Tokyo renames intersection as Rose Ochi Square

The intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo was dedicated on Tuesday, May 4, as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader.

Ochi’s widower, Tom Ochi, and lobbyist Darlene Kuba, who requested the intersection be dedicated in Ochi’s honor, joined City Councilman Kevin de Leon, who introduced the motion dedicating the square, in speaking at the ceremony.

“Rose Ochi, without a doubt, was an Angeleno and Japanese-American civil rights champion,” de Leon said. “While she passed away last year on December 13, 2020, her legacy is embedded in the history of our city as well as our state and our nation.”

  • Reverend Dr. Yoshi Tsuyuki performs a blessing during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Los Angeles City Councilman Kevin de Leon speaks during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A sign designating the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Tom Ochi, Ochi’s widower, speaks during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Reverend Dr. Yoshi Tsuyuki waits to perform a blessing during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Tom Ochi, Ochi’s widower, left, City Councilman Kevin de Leon, center, and lobbyist Darlene Kuba unveil a sign during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Los Angeles City Councilman Kevin de Leon speaks during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Tom Ochi, Ochi’s widower, left, looks on as City Councilman Kevin de Leon and lobbyist Darlene Kuba hug after unveiling a sign during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Lobbyist Darlene Kuba speaks during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Reverend Dr. Yoshi Tsuyuki performs a blessing during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Los Angeles City Councilman Kevin de Leon speaks during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • People watch during the dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Pedestrians make their way alone First St. during before a dedication of the intersection of First and Judge John Aiso streets in Little Tokyo Los Angeles as Rose Ochi Square, honoring the pioneering Japanese American civic and civil rights leader, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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Ochi was born in Boyle Heights on Dec. 15, 1938. When she was 3 years old, she and her family were sent to the Santa Anita Detention Center following President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s executive order authorizing the incarceration of more than 120,000 people of Japanese descent.

They lived at Santa Anita for six months before being sent to the Rohwer camp in Arkansas.

Her family returned to Los Angeles after the war. Ochi graduated from UCLA in 1959 and became a secondary school teacher.

The civil rights efforts of the 1960’s inspired Ochi to go to law school to put herself in a position to make a greater impact on the underserved.

After graduating from Loyola Law School in 1972, she accepted a Reginald Heber Fellowship at USC’s Western Center on Law and Poverty, where she was co-counsel on the landmark 1970s case, Serrano vs. Priest, which forced California to adopt a more equitable education funding system.

The case led to Ochi pursuing a career in public policy and advocacy.

Ochi joined Mayor Tom Bradley’s administration as director of the city’s Criminal Justice Office, developing the Los Angeles Police Department’s Use of Force Policy and advising Bradley on the Blake consent decree, which resulted increasing the hiring of women and officers of color by the LAPD.

Ochi played pivotal roles in the efforts to win passage of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which provided monetary payments to internment camp survivors, and have the Manzanar camp in the Owens Valley declared as a national historic site.

On the federal level, Ochi was a member of the Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy in the Carter administration and associate director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy and an assistant U.S. attorney general in the Clinton administration.

She was a member of the Los Angeles Police Commission from Aug. 15, 2001, to June 30, 2005, then the first executive director of the California Forensic Science Institute located at Cal State University Los Angeles.

Ochi was both the first Asian American woman to be an assistant U.S. attorney general and Los Angeles Police Commission member.

Ochi “led a remarkable life, a life of distinction, of honor and grace, of dignity and of elegance,” de Leon said. “Our nation is better for her sacrifices and her contributions. And the City of Angels is proud to call her a cherished daughter.”

She died on Dec. 13, two days before what would have been her 82nd birthday.

Supervisors take step toward ban on single-use plastics limit on county sites

LOS ANGELES >> Los Angeles County is moving to ban single-use plastics, though a vote on Tuesday, May 4, by the Board of Supervisors focused only on county facilities due to concerns about restaurants and food service businesses hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic.

Supervisors Sheila Kuehl and Hilda Solis co-authored a motion to have a number of county departments collaborate on a board policy to eliminate single-use plastics in county workplaces and buildings to the extent feasible.

“This problem has grown during the COVID-19 pandemic, as restaurant and grocery deliveries have increased exponentially and the use of reusable beverage containers and grocery bags was discouraged or disallowed early on,” the motion states.

The supervisors envision the county switching to reusable foodware or compostable or highly recyclable alternatives.

The change would also make it easier to compost and reduce the county’s organic waste in order to comply with Senate Bill 1383, which calls for a 50% reduction by 2020 and 75% by 2025. The state put California counties front and center in managing toward those goals.

In October 2019, Kuehl and Supervisor Janice Hahn championed a more ambitious plan. On their recommendation, the county asked researchers at UCLA’s Luskin Center to provide a report on managing waste and set a goal of developing an ordinance by March 2020 to reduce single-use plastics throughout unincorporated areas of the county.

The UCLA researchers found that plastic food service ware is rarely collected for recycling — primarily due to size, potential food contamination and undesirable materials — bolstering the argument to cut down on use.

Then COVID-19 struck, and the ordinance was never raised for review.

Now Kuehl and Solis say it’s not the time to impose new rules on restaurants, even though researchers think the transition to reusable or sustainable materials would be cost neutral or slightly cheaper in the long run.

“The county believes this transition should be done in partnership with restaurants when they have the capacity to fully participate in conversations about these policies and determine how to implement any required changes,” the motion reads.

It was unanimously passed without discussion by the board, although at least one member of the public called on the supervisors to do more.

“Please, it doesn’t go far enough,” said Lynne Plambeck, president of the Santa Clarita Organization for Planning and the Environment. “Plastic is just filling everything up. It’s filling up our river(s), it’s filling up our landfills.”

She urged the board to consider adopting an ordinance similar to one recently approved by the Los Angeles City Council and to also bring back the plastic bag ban, another casualty of the pandemic.

About two weeks ago, the Los Angeles City Council approved an ordinance to make disposable foodware, including utensils and napkins, only available at restaurants when requested by customers.

The ordinance, expected to take effect for businesses with more than 26 employees on Nov. 15, and for all food and beverage facilities on April 22, 2022, also bans self-service disposable foodware dispensers.

Fines will be $25 per violation starting with the second time, up to an annual maximum of $300. Council members said the ordinance could actually help save restaurants money.

A report from the International Waste Association estimated that the amount of wasted single-use foodware and accessory items has increased about 250% to 300% during the COVID-19 pandemic, as more people pick up food and dine at home.

“The casual disposal of tons of plastic utensils has severely affected our beautiful coastline,” Councilman Paul Krekorian said at the time the city motion was introduced. “This action will help us gain a measure of control over what has become an environmental catastrophe.”

The city ordinance is similar to a straws-on-request law that went into effect on April 22, 2019. The county and state earlier enacted similar laws banning restaurants from automatically giving customers plastic straws.

LA County Mental Health Department to hold free programs on art’s healing power

LOS ANGELES >> May is Mental Health Awareness Month and the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health is hosting a monthlong series of free community programs and events to highlight the healing power of art and connection for residents of all ages.

The initiative, in its fourth year, is called WE RISE.

Dr. Jonathan Sherin, who heads the Department of Mental Health underscored the importance of reaching out to others.

“Connectedness is vital to mental health and wellbeing, more so now than ever as we begin recovering from the multiple collective traumas experienced across our county this past year,” Sherin said, calling WE RISE a “heart-forward opportunity and movement built to empower our diverse communities to come together for strength and healing.”

The Art Rise component — which aims for vast scope — includes 21 outdoor art experiences created in collaboration with artists, museums and cultural institutions. It stretches across the neighborhoods of downtown Los Angeles, Koreatown, Mid-Wilshire, Leimert Park and South Los Angeles, highlighting the work of more than 35 artists and collectives.

Installations are open from sunrise to sunset. More information on the art is available at whywerise.la/art-rise/. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art will transform part of its construction fence into an exhibition wall.

Community pop-ups, workshops and other events will be held throughout the county.

One of the community pop-up projects is co-director Leila Hamidi’s “Love Letters in Light: Messages of Hope, Heartbreak, Resilience, and Love to a County on the Mend,” an installation with over 300 messages from local poets and artists, installed at 10 Los Angeles County libraries in LED message boards. People can submit to lovelettersinlight.la.

Workshops and other community events are all free and geared toward being hyperlocal, safe, socially distanced and family-friendly. They include mobile murals, live dance and music performances, cooking classes, healing meditations, art-making, storytelling and more.

CicLAvia will partner with the artists at Subsuelo for a music-powered bike ride tour of Central Avenue. Some events are virtual or drive-through and include a book giveaway with books in Spanish and English.

“WE RISE is a celebration of wellbeing, healing and resiliency, which is of greater importance as we emerge from the challenges created by the public health pandemic,” Los Angeles County Supervisor Kathryn Barger said.

“This initiative, and our ongoing efforts to enhance mental health resources and services for our residents, is an integral part of the county’s ongoing commitment to support our communities.”

More information is available at werise.la, including an event calendar and map. New events are continually being added to the schedule, which will extend to the end of the month.


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